itisiwhowillit

unadulterated ranting, it's cathartic.

Month: September, 2014

Bitch Slut Cunt

Lesbian bitch cunt needs a shag,
I see that hag but I see no fag,
What’s a hag without a fag and a fag without a hag?

I’ll break in your back door,

Have you begging for more,

And you’ll beg and you’ll beg,
You fucking wet whore.

Lesbian bitch cunt needs a shag,
I see that hag but I see no fag,
What’s a hag without a fag and a fag without a hag?

In this moment I am euphoric,
And bitch my dick is historic,
Spin my fucking fedora on it,
Lucky girl, give it a lick.

Lesbian bitch cunt needs a shag,
I see that hag but I see no fag,
What’s a hag without a fag and a fag without a hag?

But here’s the twist:
I’m a bitch and a cunt,

And a whore and a slut,
And I still wouldn’t touch your dick,
And you’d be so lucky as to dine on my clit.

Three course fucking meal you can’t afford,

You Reddit wanker super shit lord.

Lesbian bitch cunt needs a shag,
needs a shag like a hole in the head,
So you can fantasise about flopping on me,
like a fish almost dead.

Sorry, but if you don’t mind,
This bitch slut cunt has her rabbit to find.

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7 lessons from a continually alienated feminist student activist.

The lack of awareness within student politics is one of its great pitfalls. Every year women must restate that they should be able to freely and safely fight for their liberation. So, as I continue to struggle to engage with activism, here are seven lessons I would like to pass on.

1- Women are important, and including them matters.
The popular impression of feminism amongst men is that it is ‘toytown politics’ – and this is true to the extent that men don’t give a flying fuck about us.

2- You cannot escape the macro-political climate in which you swim, but you do a very good job by continuing to not recognise the destructive forces of patriarchy.

The experience of being at the mercy of huge social and political forces on one hand, and being witness to the power and desire of left-men to keep up these social and political forces is something that almost any feminist will recognise. To the extent that feminism is a left-wing or anti-capitalist endeavour at all, feminism is inextricably bound to the fortunes of the labour movement and the ‘wider-left’ who are also completely fucking ignored – to the cycles of rapists in Occupy, abusers on picket lines, and big shifts in political culture, like the now widespread habit of denouncing intersectional politics from national platforms (see also: Caitlin Moran, Lily Allen, SWP).

3- You are not too cool for school: get involved in existing groups.

JOIN NCAFC! Or don’t, because they refuse to listen to the voices of women raising concerns about our safety regarding sexual assault and emotional manipulation. Join a group if you want to, and if you share politics with a group, and feel safe in said group. Do not join a group because it is the ‘done thing’. Organise locally, build strong links and solidarity, and then we might be able to organise nationally. Make sure you local spaces are safe places for the oppressed to enter- challenge abuse wherever it arises.

4- Fight to change your collectives, because without that groundwork, we’re doomed.

Some ideas are intolerable and can only be met with scorn, confrontation and ridicule. Sadly, the majority of white men activists don’t agree on these things. Having abusers and their apologists amongst your ranks makes your organisation exlusionary to huge numbers of women and survivors whose contributions are vital. They are single mothers forced out homes due to benefits cuts. They have crucial links to the abortion movement. They are those fighting to eradicate patriarchy from capitalism and anti-capitalism alike. Do not fuck with us. In tiny activist circles and islands it is possible to forget that this is the case – and most do.

5- You are not too cool for school (again): take ideas seriously.

Ideas come in a multiplicity of formats- your conversations in pubs, your lived experience, the blogs you read and the tweets you tweet are an important part of political resistance. Sadly, not all of us have the resources, conventional ‘intelligence’, ability and time to read Das Kapital, whilst I’m sure it’s a crackin’ read. ‘Intellectual culture’ is used to silence those who are not able to learn from and challenge ideas within the format. We are derided as residing in the ‘dark corners of the internet’, when in fact, that’s where we feel safe, where we can create our own abuser-free safe spaces, and genuinely engage and learn. The internet certainly is a Marxist response.

In student activism, so much is done not on the basis of ideological conviction, but on the basis of what can get you a solid career in the labour party, and perhaps most importantly what particular people in positions of power are doing and thinking. Perhaps the most stand-out example of this in recent years is the growth of absolutely fucking clueless derision of anarchism. The portrayal of anarchists as simultaneously authoritarian circle-jerkers who seek purity, control of political spheres, or maybe just safe spaces for organising, and also as shit-smearing monkeys who are just so against structures, man is a perfect example of this bullshit misunderstanding of anarchist praxis and spaces. For example, fighting the SWP, their support for Martin Smith (don’t fucking hide his name, you coward), and pointing out the nature of the SWPs structures’ tendencies to close down dissent and cultivate abuse- whilst not forgetting their similarities to other centralised organisations *cough* – somehow then means you are against all political structures. A++ would logical fallacy again.

But seriously- take ideas seriously! Accept criticism, recognise that you *are* oppressive by the very nature of you existing in such a heteronormative, white supremacist, patriarchal ableist capitalist state, and listen to the wishes of those below you in kyriarchal structures. Another top-notch idea is this thing called ‘survivor-led processes’. If someone in your organisation has abused another person, ask the survivor what they want to happen, what will make them feel safe, valued, and that some kind of transformative justice has been pursued. Do not laugh at them, dismiss them, ignore them, or call them liars. That’s not a good idea.

6- Sabbatical officers: they aren’t all that great, and being one isn’t all that healthy.

Sabbs can do great things, they can pour money into existing projects, they can take advantage of national platforms, and they can take the fall for activists who are in a more precarious position than they. But, they’re really not all that important. Resistance existed before sabbaticals, and the annual drainage of the health, time and money of activists into elections is, truly, one of the student left’s greatest pitfalls. Year upon year new people are elected to sit at tables with management and appease those in power. Year after year radicals liberalise their politics in order to look electable. Fuck this. We need backbone if we’re going to get anywhere, comrades.

Further, many sabbaticals who leave without being consumed by the liberal establishment, or with a shred of integrity find their mental and physical health destroyed. Let’s not make out like being a sabb is a great thing, it really hurts a lot of people.

 

7- He who is tired of student activism…

should have probably left the reins to others a long time ago. 4 more years!

7 lessons from a continually alienated feminist student activist.

The lack of awareness within student politics is one of its great pitfalls. Every year women must restate that they should be able to freely and safely fight for their liberation. So, as I continue to struggle to engage with activism, here are seven lessons I would like to pass on.

1- Women are important, and including them matters.
The popular impression of feminism amongst men is that it is ‘toytown politics’ – and this is true to the extent that men don’t give a flying fuck about us.

2- You cannot escape the macro-political climate in which you swim, but you do a very good job by continuing to not recognise the destructive forces of patriarchy.

The experience of being at the mercy of huge social and political forces on one hand, and being witness to the power and desire of left-men to keep up these social and political forces is something that almost any feminist will recognise. To the extent that feminism is a left-wing or anti-capitalist endeavour at all, feminism is inextricably bound to the fortunes of the labour movement and the ‘wider-left’ who are also completely fucking ignored – to the cycles of rapists in Occupy, abusers on picket lines, and big shifts in political culture, like the now widespread habit of denouncing intersectional politics from national platforms (see also: Caitlin Moran, Lily Allen, SWP).

3- You are not too cool for school: get involved in existing groups.

JOIN NCAFC! Or don’t, because they refuse to listen to the voices of women raising concerns about our safety regarding sexual assault and emotional manipulation. Join a group if you want to, and if you share politics with a group, and feel safe in said group. Do not join a group because it is the ‘done thing’. Organise locally, build strong links and solidarity, and then we might be able to organise nationally. Make sure you local spaces are safe places for the oppressed to enter- challenge abuse wherever it arises.

4- Fight to change your collectives, because without that groundwork, we’re doomed.

Some ideas are intolerable and can only be met with scorn, confrontation and ridicule. Sadly, the majority of white men activists don’t agree on these things. Having abusers and their apologists amongst your ranks makes your organisation exlusionary to huge numbers of women and survivors whose contributions are vital. They are single mothers forced out homes due to benefits cuts. They have crucial links to the abortion movement. They are those fighting to eradicate patriarchy from capitalism and anti-capitalism alike. Do not fuck with us. In tiny activist circles and islands it is possible to forget that this is the case – and most do.

5- You are not too cool for school (again): take ideas seriously.

Ideas come in a multiplicity of formats- your conversations in pubs, your lived experience, the blogs you read and the tweets you tweet are an important part of political resistance. Sadly, not all of us have the resources, conventional ‘intelligence’, ability and time to read Das Kapital, whilst I’m sure it’s a crackin’ read. ‘Intellectual culture’ is used to silence those who are not able to learn from and challenge ideas within the format. We are derided as residing in the ‘dark corners of the internet’, when in fact, that’s where we feel safe, where we can create our own abuser-free safe spaces, and genuinely engage and learn. The internet certainly is a Marxist response.

In student activism, so much is done not on the basis of ideological conviction, but on the basis of what can get you a solid career in the labour party, and perhaps most importantly what particular people in positions of power are doing and thinking. Perhaps the most stand-out example of this in recent years is the growth of absolutely fucking clueless derision of anarchism. The portrayal of anarchists as simultaneously authoritarian circle-jerkers who seek purity, control of political spheres, or maybe just safe spaces for organising, and also as shit-smearing monkeys who are just so against structures, man is a perfect example of this bullshit misunderstanding of anarchist praxis and spaces. For example, fighting the SWP, their support for Martin Smith (don’t fucking hide his name, you coward), and pointing out the nature of the SWPs structures’ tendencies to close down dissent and cultivate abuse- whilst not forgetting their similarities to other centralised organisations *cough* – somehow then means you are against all political structures. In the words of a fellow evil feminist friend “quote”. Logical fallacies, whodathunk a cutesy little woman like me would understand.

But seriously- take ideas seriously! Accept criticism, recognise that you *are* oppressive by the very nature of you existing in such a heteronormative, white supremacist, patriarchal ableist capitalist state, and listen to the wishes of those below you in kyriarchal structures. Another top-notch idea is this thing called ‘survivor-led processes’. If someone in your organisation has abused another person, ask the survivor what they want to happen, what will make them feel safe, valued, and that some kind of transformative justice has been pursued. Do not laugh at them, dismiss them, ignore them, or call them liars. That’s not a good idea.

6- Sabbatical officers: they aren’t all that great, and being one isn’t all that healthy.

Sabbs can do great things, they can pour money into existing projects, they can take advantage of national platforms, and they can take the fall for activists who are in a more precarious position than they. But, they’re really not all that important. Resistance existed before sabbaticals, and the annual drainage of the health, time and money of activists into elections is, truly, one of the student left’s greatest pitfalls. Year upon year new people are elected to sit at tables with management and appease those in power. Year after year radicals liberalise their politics in order to look electable. Fuck this. We need backbone if we’re going to get anywhere, comrades.

Further, many sabbaticals who leave without being consumed by the liberal establishment, or with a shred of integrity find their mental and physical health destroyed. Let’s not make out like being a sabb is a great thing, it really hurts a lot of people.

 

7- He who is tired of student activism…

should have probably left the reins to others a long time ago. 4 more years!

The student movement.

No More Page 3 think modelling and child abuse are the same thing.

Content note: This blog will discuss child abuse, rape, sexual assault and harassment.

It’s no secret that I’m not a fan of No More Page 3, but I’ve yet to contribute to the debate in this format, largely because I find the responses of NMP3 supporters dripping with radical feminism, whorephobia, and find middle-class respectability politics forced onto me. But NMP3’s latest contribution is so bad I just can’t help myself.

A few days ago (August 31st) the official No More Page 3 facebook page posted a comic of a man reading ‘The News’ (The S*n), and being outraged at the Rotherham child abuse scandal, but then flicking to page 3, and looking at this week’s model, an 18 year old named Kelly.

It might not seem damaging from the outset, but scratching the surface of this cartoon, its implications and its intentions reveals not only deeply problematic politics, but politics that seriously endanger sex workers, who are, whether you like it or not, part of our fight for gender liberation.

1- This comic makes a comparison between sex work, paedophilia and child abuse. It says that those who enjoy pornography or are clients of sex workers are the same as child abusers.  Child abusers are child abusers and should be recognised as such- all else gives them a defence, a mechanism by which we can relate to them, and an excuse. 

2- It paints sex workers as survivors by virtue of their work- after all, they are paid for by child abusers, and as money = power, that means they are controlled by child abusers.

3- Treating sex workers as survivors minimises any abuse they may have experienced separate to their work (which might also include child abuse!) whilst simultaneously saying that any abuse they do experience as part of their work is an inevitability. In short: you’re saying they’re destined to be abused, so why even bother fighting with and for them?

4- It removes agency. It treats sex workers as children, and is part of a rhetoric that infantalises sex workers so that middle class white feminists can continue to denounce them. It says that they are unable to give consent, but fails to recognise that consent to *all* work – not just sex work- and sexual relationships are manufactured within the confines of capitalism. It says you cannot consent because we disagree with what you do, but of course we can consent to whatever we want to do, because we’re not you.

5- It completely erases the severity of child abuse by comparing it to a line of work that human beings can and actually do find fulfilling and worthwhile. Do we really believe that women like Jodie Marsh and Katie Price have no agency, no intelligence, and are merely victims? Child abuse is not pornography, it is not work- it is child abuse.

6- It places complicity on the shoulders of sex workers. It tells them that they are in some way responsible for the structural abuse of children, rather than laying blame at the feet of the actual perpetrators: those at the top, not the bottom, of kyriarchal structures. Considering that inevitably, some sex workers will be survivors of rape, domestic abuse, and child abuse, this attitude also tells them they are complicit in their own abuse- we have a name for this, and it’s called victim blaming, and it’s not feminist.

7- In traditional NMP3 style, it continues to erase all of the horrible things that The S*n has done and continues to do, like inciting racial hatred, humiliating benefit claimants, and taking photos on semi-naked women *without* their consent. More explicitly tied with child abuse, The S*n have run countdowns to when people turn 16. By ignoring this, you’re saying that what creates *actual* abuse is secondary to bashing women whose job you don’t like.

I want a feminism that stands with sex workers and doesn’t humiliate and vilify them, a feminism that stands with those in poverty and accepts structural relationships between race, gender, sexuality, class and work. A feminism that, rather than ‘protecting’ sex workers and stabbing them in the back, seeks to help in any way possible with unionisation, destigmatisation, and with these things, an increase in pay, an end to police brutality, and safer working conditions,

Pornography is not evil, child abuse is.

No More Page 3: fuck you.

breaking it down- Plan C and the Vampire Castle.

Let me get this straight from the outset: I am a proud inhabitant of the vampire castle. I suck the lifeforce of the left to feed my ego and nourish the irrelevant intelligentsia I call my fellow vampires. I am middle class, I have always been middle class, and I will always be middle class, I regularly use words like ‘globalised postmodern simulacrative constellation of capital’ because I’m so damned middle class, and I like to use the words I learned in private school.

Except, I’m not. I’m a poor, disabled women from a mining family in South Yorkshire. I went to a state school that no longer exists and was in the lowest achieving group in the country. People went there with weapons. I have no money, and currently, I have no home, and am relying on the generosity of friends to help me get by (who said the left wasn’t generous, huh?).

Oh, and I’m disabling the comments on this blog because my blog isn’t a fucking democracy and I don’t actually have to listen to your inevitable misogynistic abuse.

So, Plan C, you wanted to call your magazine Trigger. That’s cool. Or not.

Should we call it ‘Trigger’?

Counterproposal:

Those opposing the name Trigger were concerned that it would be read as critique, satire or even mockery, of the ‘trigger warning’ practice. They were right. They were concerned that this would be needlessly inflammatory and uncomradely. Plan C has not previously entered into the debate around trigger warnings and the wider politics associated with it, and has had no internal discussions about it. we don’t care about it. There are differences of opinion on it within the group. We’re not a boring homogenous group of white men, honest. They were therefore concerned that the name Trigger could cause tension both within the group and with people outside it. Particular discomfort was felt by some about the name Trigger’s potential to be seen as mocking.

Discussion

Some people did not agree that Trigger was likely to be read as satirical or mocking. They were wrong. How the hell do these people magically know what others think? Time travel? Telepathy? Someone call Mulder. Others disagreed, and were sure that it would. Several people recounted friends taking the magazine name to be a satire on trigger warnings, and suggested this would unfortunately be a widespread interpretation, regardless of our intentions. It was noted that the movement we currently find ourselves in is not generous Do we have to be generous? Are you generous with the rich? Why are we allowed to kill the rich and eat the rich, but not be pissy with ableists? Is it because, in the eyes of Plan C, disability is secondary to class? Is it because you either fail to understand or willingly ignore the ways in which capital and disability intersect? How those affected most by austerity are disabled? How those both physically and mentally disabled struggle to enter political spaces for fear of mockery, ignorance, or maybe not even being able to physically get into your building? How about the ways in which oppression related trauma and disability intersect? The PTSD survivors are left with? The fear of leaving his home a young man of colour experiences? Those who do not allow us space to organise around our trauma in a way that makes us safe and able to be counted are our enemies, just as the rich are our enemies. You deserve nothing short of our contempt until you change this, does not always take things in the spirit in which they were intended sadly, intention doesn’t matter bro. Your good intentions won’t stop my panic attacks, take me off medication, or gain my trust, and has tendencies to moralistic policing by invoking policing, you make us the powerful. We are not the powerful, and this is precisely the point. We are not policing  you, we are defending ourselves. And, whilst it’s in your own interests as individuals to make martyrs of yourself, to tell the left that you’re fighting the parasites, we all know this isn’t true.. Though there was a great deal of discomfort in the feeling that we were being cowardly and pandering to these tendencies Again, invoking power dynamics that simply do not exist. Implying that survivors and those with trauma are on top is total nonsense- total nonsense that removes the impact of the experiences that so often debilitate us which we are strongly opposed to, there was also concern that, regardless of the politics involved, it would not go well for us if we called the magazine Trigger. The point was made that we should look to confront these problems at some point, as it is crippling the left What left? Feminists haven’t recently come along and changed everything- the left has always been fractured, and this is a good thing, as it allows for fluidity and learning. If we were a homogenous bunch, we’d achieve jack shit. and creating a poisonous For the love of God, drop this fucking rhetoric. We are humans, we are not poisonous parasites atmosphere for organising. This met with wide and heartfelt agreement. It felt to some like we were making a retrogressive, pragmatic decision rather than engaging with a substantial political problem. Now, I don’t mean to be rude, but I think you might be overstating how important the name of your magazine is. If you want to engage in this issue- engage with it. Talk to us rather than at and past us. Consider our histories, our current situtations, and our oppressions. Empathise with us. We are angry because you are oppressing us.

It was noted there has not been enough respect to the time and energy that went into choosing the name, and that this problem arose several months later than it should have. lol.